Donald Trump

Every country is entitled to set its own immigration policy, control its own borders and do what it thinks is in the best interests of its citizens’ safety. On those issues, no nation should interfere, but the UK has an obligation to speak out and to be a critical friend to the USA because of the ramifications of the President’s Executive order for the internal stability and security of our country and the rest of the world. The order undermines what our Prime Minister said so eloquently in her speech to Republicans of both Houses of Congress last week in Philadelphia about the need not only to defeat Daesh on the battlefield, but to defeat its ideology.

The Executive order is not only wholly counterproductive in combating terrorism and the narrative of Daesh, but could worsen the situation, playing into the hands of those who would see more terrorist atrocities, not less. Those sympathetic to Daesh will link the order to abhorrent recent events—most notably, the burning of a mosque in Texas and tragic shootings at another mosque in Quebec, Canada.

I was delighted that our Prime Minister and President Trump pledged to renew the special relationship between the UK and the USA—a relationship that has proven beneficial for both countries. The uniqueness of the special relationship has meant that the Prime Minister has rightly conveyed her concerns to the President’s Administration, with some success.

If this strategy of calling for a sensible review of the order is to continue, we cannot possibly have a constructive discussion with the President unless we maintain close relations. For this reason, I think we should welcome President Trump to the UK, so that we can engage in meaningful dialogue with our closest ally in the hope of a change of stance.

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